Tag Archive: NFL Lockout


UDFA Tracker

Here is my tracker for the UDFA frenzy going on right now. This is my preliminary list, I will update it when and however I can throughout the day as rumors become official, etc.

Martin Parker, DT, Richmond- New York Giants- Confirmed with him via text
Terrence Tolliver, WR, LSU- Houston Texas- Confirmed with him via text
DeAndre McDaniel, SS, Clemson- New Orleans Saints
Derrick Locke, RB, Kentucky- Minnesota Vikings
Graig Cooper, RB, Miami- Philadelphia Eagles
Kendric Burney, CB, North Carolina- Carolina Panthers
Deunta Williams, S, North Carolina- Tweeted that he needs to rehab before signing. Tough break for a great kid.
Mark Herzlich, OLB, Boston College- New York Giants
Jeron Johnson, SS, Boise State- Seattle Seahawks
Pat Devlin, QB, Delaware- Miami Dolphins
Noel Devine, RB, West Virginia- Philadelphia Eagles
Darren Evans, RB, Virginia Tech- Indianapolis Colts
Dane Sanzenbacher, WR, Ohio State- Chicago Bears confirmed! Big get for them, he could stick.
Perry Baker, WR, Fairmont State- Philadelphia Eagles!! *Confirmed with him via text*
Andre Smith, TE, Virginia Tech- Chicago Bears
John Graves, DT, Virgina Tech- Houston Texans
Stevan Friday, DE, Virginia Tech- Houston Texans
Pierre Allen, DE, Nebraska- Seattle Seahawks
Chris Matthews, WR, Kentucky- Cleveland Browns
Ian Williams, DT, Notre Dame- San Francisco 49ers
Ted Laurent, DT, Mississippi- Was with CFL team, haven’t heard anything yet.
Kenny Rowe, OLB, Oregon- San Francisco 49ers
Ugo Chinasa, DE, Oklahoma State- Hearing Carolina Panthers
Justin Trattou, DE, Florida- Haven’t heard anything
Mario Harvey, ILB, Marshall- Pittsburgh Steelers
Mario Butler, CB, Georgia Tech- Dallas Cowboys
Dom Decicco, SS, Pittsburgh- Chicago Bears
Jerrod Johnson, QB, Texas A&M- Philadelphia Eagles
Adam Weber, QB, Minnesota- Denver Broncos
Armon Binns, WR, Cincinnati- Jacksonville Jaguars
Allen Reisner, TE, Iowa- Minnesota Vikings
Zach Hurd, OG, Connecticut- Seattle Seahawks
Craig Marshall, DE, South Florida- New York Giants
Isaac Odim, RB, Minnesota-Duluth- San Diego Chargers confirmed
Ryan Bartholomew, C, Syracuse- Baltimore Ravens
Vai Taua, RB, Nevada- Buffalo Bills
Adam Froman, QB, Louisville- Atlanta Falcons
Ryan Winterswyk, DE, Boise State- Atlanta Falcons
Darren Johnson-Koulianos, WR, Iowa- Philadelphia Eagles I hear. Very intriguing.
Jimmy Young, WR, TCU- Chicago Bears
John Clay, RB, Wisconsin- Pittsburgh Steelers
Isaac Anderson, WR, Wisconsin- Interest from multiple teams, has not signed yet.
Daryll Gamble, LB, Georgia- San Diego Chargers
Dominique Johnson, WR, Cal Poly- Minnesota Vikings
Randall Hunt, OG, Illinois- St. Louis Rams- Martin Parker said he was the toughest OL at East-West Shrine Game
Armando Allen, RB, Notre Dame- Tampa Bay Buccaneers
Eddie McGee, QB/WR, Illinois- Oakland Raiders- Looks like Al woke up from his nap.
Clay Nurse, DE, Illinois- New England Patriots
Adrian Cannon, WR, Maryland- San Diego Chargers
Joe Horn, WR, Ashland (OH)- Indianapolis Colts
Robert McGill, OT, Louisiana Tech- Atlanta Falcons
Anthony Leonard, LB, West Virginia- New England Patriots
Brandon Bair, DE, Oregon- Kansas City Chiefs- Great fit he screams 3-4 DE, great size.
David Gilreath, WR/KR, Wisconsin- Indianapolis- They love the undersized, slot guys. Has KR/special teams value.
Thomas Weber, K, Arizona State- Cincinnati Bengals
Josue Paul, WR, Central Connecticut- Kansas City
Julian Posey, CB, Ohio- New York Jets
Ray Dominguez, OG, Arkansas- Green Bay Packers
M.D. Jennings, S, Arkansas State- Green Bay Packers
Diondre Borel, QB, Utah State- Green Bay Packers
Theo Sherman, OL, James Madison- Green Bay Packers
Zac Etheridge, S, Auburn- Oakland Raiders!
Mario Fannin, RB, Auburn- Denver Broncos
Ryan Jones- Chicago Bears
Detron Lewis, WR, Texas Tech- Tampa Bay
Corey Brandon, OL, Oklahoma- Tampa Bay
Kiante Tripp, DT, Georgia- Atlanta Falcons
Jabari Fletcher, DE, Appalachian State- Cleveland Browns
Josh Jasper, K, LSU- Tampa Bay
Ollie Ogbu, DT, Penn State- Indianapolis Colts
James McCluskey, FB, Boston College- Oakland Raiders
Jock Sanders, WR, West Virginia- Tampa Bay Buccaneers
Charlie Gantt, TE, Michigan State- Kansas City Chiefs- Confirmed
Maurice Rolle, DB- Houston Texans
Robert Hughes, RB/FB, Notre Dame- Chicago Bears
Blake Sorensen, LB, Wisconsin- Seattle Seahawks (via Wisconsin football players)

I’ll try to update this list more later, just trying to keep up!

–Tom

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Scouting Report:

Everyone knows that Pryor has upside because of his size and athletic ability, but I don't think he has it in him to be a quality NFL quarterback.

Pryor has a lot of upside because of his size and athletic ability, but I am not sold on him being a NFL quarterback despite Drew Rosenhaus’ claims to the contrary. I think he should consider moving to receiver in the NFL, but obviously I understand if he wants to give quarterback a legitimate shot. I just don’t think he has it in him to play QB at the NFL level based off of what I’ve seen. He’s not a bad college quarterback, but a lot of his tendencies translate very poorly to the NFL. I will explain those more in depth in my scouting report below, but I have to say I would be surprised if Pryor was drafted any earlier than the 4th or 5th round in the NFL Supplemental Draft. Any earlier and he is being drafted for his athletic potential and his possible switch to receiver, not because of his ability and upside as a quarterback.

Size: Pryor’s combination of size and athletic ability is rare for the quarterback position. He is listed at 6’6”, 233 pounds according to what I can find, which is pretty incredible. I would like to see him hold a “pro-day” of sorts just to get official measurements as well as a relatively accurate 40 time, but I would be surprised if that happened for the Supplemental Draft. He has more than enough size to play QB in the NFL, but his size and athleticism also makes him an intriguing player for a conversion to WR.

Arm Strength: Pryor has natural arm strength, not a lot of it, but he can get the ball downfield. However, he rarely has good zip on his throws, especially intermediate or deep passes. He has the arm strength to play in the NFL but he doesn’t have the zip on his throws to consistently threaten defenses on intermediate throws, if that makes sense.

Accuracy: This is one of the major problems with Pryor’s game. He shows the occasional (and I have to emphasize that word) flash to be accurate, but far too often his passes are inaccurate. He struggles with ball placement, doesn’t regularly throw to the right shoulder on deep passes, doesn’t do a good job of hitting his receivers in stride consistently and far too often his receivers are trying to dig out low throws, diving/reaching to get to throws behind them, etc. His accuracy could be improved with significant mechanical improvement, but he will never be a very accurate passer and currently his accuracy is poor.

Mechanical: This is another significant issue with Pryor’s game. His mechanics are not consistent in any positive aspect. At times he doesn’t have a clean drop from under center, he has happy feet in the pocket regularly as you can almost sense that he is itching to run, and while his throwing motion is solid it could use some tweaking. He doesn’t dip it down to his waist or anything though, to his credit. He consistently throws off balance however, he doesn’t square his shoulders up to the line of scrimmage when scrambling to his left, he throws across his body back to the middle of the field in rare instances, and routinely throws without resetting his feet. However, even in a clean pocket his mechanics and accuracy are less than impressive.

Mobility: This is perhaps the highlight of Pryor’s game and the part of his game that gives him the most upside in the NFL as a possible quarterback and as a receiver. I would expect him to run something around the 4.5 range if he did run a 40 yard dash time. He has impressive quickness for his size, he has a good burst, and he just has a good feel for running in the open field. His ball security needs work as he will neglect to tuck the ball away sometimes, but he has the straight line speed (thanks to his long strides) to threaten teams as a receiver as well.

Pre/Post Snap Reads: Pryor struggles in this aspect of the game as well. He does make two reads fairly consistently but he rarely scans the field and delivers the ball, rather he will go through a couple of his progressions (sometimes in a rush it seems) and then take off, so I question if he is actually scanning the field to throw or whether he is just waiting until he inevitably takes off scrambling. I am also not very convinced that he has a good sense of making reads pre-snap, which leads to him being surprised by blitzers that come free off the edge at times.

Pocket Poise: As you can probably guess, I was not impressed with Pryor’s pocket poise. He regularly looks antsy in the pocket and drops his eyes too quickly in the face of pressure, and looks to scramble out of the pocket instead of stepping up to remain in the pocket to continue scanning the field. He also doesn’t deal well with pressure, and seems to panic and look to escape instead of standing tall to deliver a throw downfield.

Intangibles: I am not convinced Pryor is a great leader and I don’t think he is clutch. He has made plays late in games before, but he is just as likely to make a play that helps your team as he is to hurt your team, and a lot of that has to deal with his inconsistent mechanics and poor decision making. He takes so many risks, makes so many off balance throws, and participates in so many broken plays that when he takes a chance late in a game he can make a play and get a completion on a throw or a 1st down running or he can throw an interception. I don’t think his good plays are a reflection of any kind of clutch demeanor, but I also don’t think his interceptions are a reflection of him wilting under pressure necessarily. I think he is indifferent to the pressure to some degree, and just makes the same decisions that he makes when there isn’t pressure. Unfortunately he doesn’t regularly make good decisions then either, so bad plays happen late in games as well.

Character: Pryor’s character has to come into question because of the investigations going on at Ohio State, and while I don’t think he is a serious character concern I do think that he comes off as arrogant at times, and clearly didn’t show the best decision making in reference to the tattoos and cars he has been linked to as a result of those investigations. It will be interesting to see just how good or bad his character is, but he clearly thinks highly enough of himself that he wasn’t willing to consider very legitimate options such as the CFL and UFL, which plenty of other players have had to consider in lieu of the NFL lockout. I don’t want to say he is being arrogant for refusing to consider playing receiver, but depending on how long he refuses or resists that possible transition it might come off that way.

Scouting Report:

Mark Ingram is one of the most well-rounded running backs to enter the draft in years.

Positives: Ingram is a very talented RB. He has good speed and can get the corner (probably 4.48-4.5 speed approximately) and has pretty good burst to hit a hole or to break off a nice chunk of yardage. He runs with good power, runs through arm tackles easily, has impressive leg drive and has great vision to run between the tackles. He secures the ball well and rarely fumbles and he has shown some ability as a pass protector. He also catches well in the flat or out of the backfield even though he isn’t a featured receiver in their offense, but he has soft enough hands to catch screens or passes in the flat in the NFL. Does a good job of getting North/South and doesn’t waste a lot of time dancing around in the backfield wasting steps. Does a very good job of patiently allowing his blocks to set up but then identifies the cut-back lane and plants and drives very effectively.

Negatives: Isn’t the most explosive back and doesn’t have elite speed to break off huge runs or to get the corner and won’t be as effective on toss or stretch plays in the NFL as he was in college as far as getting the edge. He could stand to improve as a pass protector but most rookies coming from the college ranks need improvement, he at least has experience doing so. Might not have the highest ceiling because he has shown so much of what he can do at Alabama.

Overall: Ingram is a special running back prospect, not because he is an insanely electrifying athlete but because he is a quality athlete that plays intelligently and does things the right way. He is about as well rounded as running backs get coming out of college and should be able to contribute, if not start, immediately once he reaches the NFL. I haven’t seen him block a lot as a pass protector, but given some coaching I’m sure he can develop into a reliable pass blocker should he be asked to stay in and protect. He is a rare player in that he is an every down player in a league that does not have many of those left. He can run the ball between the tackles to wear down a defense, he can catch the ball out of the backfield on screens or on a check down, and he can stay in to pass protect on 3rd down and long on obvious passing situations. He should be a top 20 lock, but you never know what will happen on draft day. In a league where teams seem content to draft running backs later and later Ingram will reward whoever drafts him in round one with a very consistent and dependable running back for the next seven or eight years.

Projection: Top 20. He shouldn’t get past the Dolphins at #15 or the Patriots at #17 but if he does someone could very well have a steal on their hands. He isn’t a flashy, unreal athlete but he is extremely well rounded. That means he won’t go in the top five, but he will be worth every penny you pay him.

SKILLS 1-poor, 2-weak, 3-above average,4-very good, 5-elite

SPEED: 4.0
POWER: 5.0
AGILITY: 4.0
VISION: 5.0
HANDS: 3.5
BLOCKING: 3.0

Hopefully you all enjoyed my scouting report on Mark Ingram. In the coming days I should have a report up on James Carpenter, Greg McElroy, Marcell Dareus and Julio Jones. So keep checking back in!

Thanks for reading!

–Tom