Tag Archive: Jarrett Lee

1- Andrew Luck, QB, Stanford: Grade: #1 overall pick
2- Matt Barkley, QB, Southern Cal: Grade: Top 5-10 overall pick
3- Robert Griffin, QB, Baylor: Grade: Top 15 overall pick
4- Landry Jones, QB, Oklahoma: Grade: Late 1st/Early 2nd
5- Ryan Tannehill, QB, Texas A&M: Grade: 2nd round
6- Russell Wilson, QB, Wisconsin: Grade: 3rd round
7- Brock Osweiler, QB, Arizona State: Grade: 3rd round
8- Brandon Weeden, QB, Oklahoma State: Grade: 3rd/4th round
9- Geno Smith, QB, West Virginia: Grade: 3rd/4th round
10- B.J. Coleman, QB, Chattanooga: Grade: 4th round
11- Ryan Lindley, QB, San Diego State: Grade: 4th/5th round
12- Kirk Cousins, QB, Michigan State: Grade: 5th round
13- Kellen Moore, QB, Boise State: Grade: 5th round
14- Nick Foles, QB, Arizona: Grade: 5th/6th round
15- Chandler Harnish, QB, Northern Illinois: Grade: 5th/6th round
16- John Brantley, QB, Florida: Grade: 6th round
17- Matt Scott, QB, Arizona: Grade: 6th round/7th round
18- Patrick Witt, QB, Yale: Grade: 7th round/UDFA
19- Case Keenum, QB, Houston: Grade: 7th round/UDFA
20- Dominique Davis, QB, East Carolina: Grade: UDFA
21- G.J. Kinne, QB, Tulsa: Grade: UDFA
22- Aaron Corp, QB, Richmond: Grade: UDFA
23- Austin Davis, QB, Southern Mississippi: Grade: UDFA
24- Jarrett Lee, QB, LSU: Grade: UDFA
25- Jordan Jefferson, QB, LSU: Grade: UDFA


Jarrett Lee has done a great job filling in for the Tigers in the wake of Jordan Jefferson's suspension (which coincidentally ended yesterday as LSU reinstated him) and it will be interesting to see exactly what his role is throughout the rest of the season.

Jarrett Lee (Senior) has been a quality starter for LSU this year, but he isn’t a great NFL prospect. He has solid size at 6’2”, 206 and he has solid mobility. His arm strength leaves a lot to be desired, and he struggles to put zip on throws beyond 10 or so yards. His deep passes have a lot of air under them, and I’m not sure he can make every NFL throw with solid zip. He’s a pretty accurate passer but his deep balls aren’t often well placed, either over throwing his receivers or putting the ball on the wrong shoulder. I think that a lot of his inaccurate passes can be traced back to his issues with stepping into his passes, especially in the face of pressure. He has gotten better about this, but it is still a very significant issue. Frequently when he feels pressure he instinctually fades away from the pressure as he throws instead of stepping into it. That hurts his zip and his ball placement, and it’s very noticeable. He seems to be very smart and the team seems to respect him as a leader in spite of the loss of Jordan Jefferson, and I think they have a chance to win a National Title with him at the helm thanks to their amazing defense. I thought he reminded me a bit of Matt Flynn when I had seen him before, but he doesn’t have the same arm and poise that Flynn did in my opinion. I think he’s a very late round prospect or an undrafted free agent as of right now, but he’s got the potential to stick as a #3 or as a practice squad QB in the NFL. He’s only throw 87 passes in four games (about 22 per game) and while he has been efficient in those attempts, it will be interesting to see how he and the rest of the LSU offense does if he is forced to throw to open up the running game if opposing defenses stack the box and slow down LSU’s powerful combination of Spencer Ware and Michael Ford. I think they might struggle, but I think they can win as long as he isn’t forced to throw 35+ times a game.

Spencer Ware (Sophomore) is a guy that I was extremely impressed with him when I watched him against Texas A&M in the Cotton Bowl. He seems bigger and more powerful this season, and he has really impressed me in all three games of his that I’ve watched. Against Oregon he demonstrated fantastic leg drive, a great ability to push a pile, an unwillingness to go down to the first hit, and he frequently ran through arm tackles. His cuts weren’t incredibly crisp and were at times slightly deliberate, but he also has good quickness considering his size (5’11”, 225 pounds or so). He also showed pretty reliable hands out of the backfield. I think he definitely has the potential to be a 3rd or 4th round pick in the NFL Draft (since he probably won’t run a great 40 yard dash time or blow people away in drills) when he comes out this year or next, and then be a very effective power back in the NFL. I think he has quality vision, great power, and good hands. He has done a great job of wearing defenses down and grinding out tough yards for LSU this year. Then Michael Ford comes in and gashes them, and Jarrett Lee burns them with play-action passes.

Michael Ford (Sophomore) is the quicker LSU back, though he is still a load to bring down. He’s listed at 5’10”, 215 pounds and he has a lot of quickness and burst based on what I have seen. He demonstrated solid hands in addition to good vision to find cut-back lanes and seams, he ran patiently much like Spencer Ware, but he has more speed to rip off runs for large chunks of yardage. That’s why he and Ware are such a potent one-two punch. Ware grinds the defense down, then Ford comes in and is just as likely to run you over as he is to outrun you to the edge. He’s a quality back, and definitely has it in him to be a feature back in the NFL.

Rueben Randle has a lot of potential due to his combination of size and athletic ability, but I want to see him make catches with his hands away from his body more consistently. He tends to body catch, and that leads to unnecessary drops at times.

Rueben Randle (Junior) is an intriguing wide receiver because of his size, but his hands are inconsistent. He can make catches with his hands, but will also let passes get into his pads. He also attempts to jump up and catch passes at chest level (like on back shoulder throws in the red zone) instead of simply catching them with his hands away from his body. But at 6’4”, 208 pounds he definitely intrigues you because he has the speed to threaten deep and he can win jump balls because of his size and athletic ability. But if his hands don’t improve he won’t ever reach his upside as a receiver. That sounds stupid to say because a receiver’s job is to catch the ball first and foremost, but every year there are players that are over-drafted because of how good they could be if they learned how to catch the damn ball.

Odell Beckham (Freshman) has been huge for LSU so far this year. He doesn’t have great numbers (17 receptions, 193 yards and 1 touchdown) but he has made some big catches and has proven to be one of the most reliable (if not the most reliable) receivers on LSU’s roster. He’s been getting significant playing time and he continues to impress me every time I watch him. But being able to play well in his first game as a true freshman receiver in a critical game against one of the two teams who played for the National Championship the year before is extremely impressive. I always say that I love identifying players that step up in critical moments or in big games, and Beckham is well on his way to getting that reputation as far as I’m concerned. Watch out for him, because he’s going to be a good one.

Deangelo Peterson (Junior) is a tight end that reminds me a lot of Lance Kendricks, a tight end that I was extremely high on last year and had as my #1 TE for almost the entire year. Peterson is very athletic, has reliable hands, tracks the ball very well in the air, adjusts to the ball well in the air, can catch the ball away from his body, makes tough catches in traffic or with defenders draped over him, has enough speed to threaten down the seam, and offers solid run blocking as a wall-off blocker in the run game. He isn’t the same blocker that Kendricks is, but he’s got a similar blocking “style” in that he won’t drive block defensive ends four yards downfield, but he will get his hands on them and “wall them off” to create a seam or a cut-back lane and to take his man out of the play, even if he doesn’t dominate him. He’s only a junior, and in LSU’s run-heavy attack he won’t be featured very often, especially with all the talent they trot out at receiver, but outside of Orson Charles and Michael Egnew there might not be a better tight end in the country.

Darron Thomas has ability as a quarterback, but I don't think he is a consistent or polished enough passer to project well to the NFL at this point.

Darron Thomas (Junior) had his struggles in this game. I don’t think he is a pure passer, rather he has the ability to pass but also threatens as a runner because of his athleticism, and I think he will be an effective college quarterback but not an effective NFL quarterback. He has solid size at 6’3”, 215 but he looks VERY skinny on film. He doesn’t go through his progressions very regularly and has a tendency to stare his receivers down, partially because of him and partially because of the offense he plays in. Regardless, it reinforces bad habits and it almost led to a pick six or two against LSU because of Tyrann Mathieu’s great instincts and closing speed. His accuracy is good on shorter throws, but as he passes further downfield it becomes more erratic, and he doesn’t seem to have a very good sense of timing. I do think he understands  how to attack zone coverage, but doesn’t understand WHEN to attack zone coverage. A few times he threw the ball behind his intended receiver but it was in the correct hole in the zone, so his receiver had to stop and make a catch on a ball thrown behind him. While that might look like a bad throw/poor accuracy, it reflects that Thomas knew that if he led his receiver he would lead him either into a huge hit or potentially give the defender a shot at the turnover. However, after re-watching the plays it was evident that he just didn’t go through his progressions fast enough and didn’t get the ball out quick enough, because the throw was there earlier as the play was developing. He just didn’t see it, and because he was delivering it late he had to throw it behind his receiver to put it where only his receiver would have a chance to catch it. So while he does have above average accuracy, solid arm strength and mobility, I’m just not sure he has the intangibles to make it as a quarterback in the NFL.

LaMichael James (Junior) has a ton of potential as a 3rd down back and as a complementary back in the NFL, but I don’t think he can be the feature back for an offense like he is at Oregon. The Ducks throw the ball very frequently, and James rarely has to be the guy that grinds down the defense at Oregon. While he did average about 24.5 carries per game as a redshirt sophomore last season, he was averaging almost 6 yards per carry and did not get hit hard frequently. He is most dangerous in the open field, when he can find a cut-back lane, or when he can bounce a run outside. While he is also effective running between the tackles, that is not the best use of his speed and elusiveness. And because of his size (5’9”, 185 pounds) I don’t think he could hold up to the constant pounding that a NFL RB takes on a game to game basis. That makes me think he is a late 1st to early 2nd round pick as far as my grade on him. He has a lot of ability and is an absolute game-breaker, but I don’t think he should be running the ball 20+ times per game in the NFL every week. Giving him 8-10 carries and some passes out of the backfield or when he is split out on a linebacker maximizes his value in my opinion. I really do think he can go that high though, because his speed, quickness, burst, vision and hands are all good enough to step in and contribute to a NFL team right away.

D'Anthony Thomas has a lot of game-breaking speed, and he impressed me as a receiver and as a running back against LSU. He's going to be fun to watch as he develops.

D’Anthony Thomas (Freshman) definitely stuck out to me because this was his first game as a true freshman as well, and he played very well before having some “rookie” struggles in the second half when he lost two fumbles to an opportunistic LSU team. However, his upside and versatility is undeniable. In four games playing both receiver and running back he has totaled 11 receptions, 172 yards and two touchdowns, 173 rushing yards on 23 attempts (7.52 ypc average) and one touchdown. Plus he has returned eight kickoffs for 163 yards, and has returned 3 punts for 52 yards (17.33 average per return). He’s undersized at only 5’9”, 173 pounds but he can get up to 180 or 185 pretty easily in my opinion. But one thing he definitely has is speed. He is extremely fast, has great burst and has reliable hands. He made some big catches on 3rd downs and was one of Darron Thomas’ most reliable targets against LSU as he had six of his 11 total receptions on the season in that game. It will be interesting to see how his role develops as the season goes on, but he is definitely a talented player and one that everyone should keep an eye on.

David Paulson (Senior) is a solid TE who I think will creep up boards slowly this year. He isn’t featured in this high flying Oregon offense by any means, but he has great size for a TE at 6’4”, 241 pounds. He isn’t an athletic freak and I don’t think he will blow you away with his 40 yard dash time, but he has reliable hands and provides Thomas with a reliable security blanket. He only has seven receptions for 48 yards and one touchdown in four games, but I think Paulson is a guy that will be under the radar for the majority of the season. If he is going to emerge I think it will be during the post-season in a game like the Senior Bowl or more likely the East-West Shrine Game where he will prove he has the necessary skills to play at the next level once he gets more reps and touches throughout the practices. I think he’s a solid sleeper at the TE position based off of what I’ve seen, but I don’t think he will ever be a game-breaker either.

Hopefully you enjoyed the second section of my Oregon-LSU post. I apologize for the length of each post, but hopefully most people reading this appreciate more information versus less. Thanks for reading, and look for a couple preliminary scouting reports in the next couple days!


NCAA Top 25 Picks Post

Here is a post where I make some picks for the games the top 25 teams are playing for the week. I’ll try to do this every week, but I might not always have time. I’ll track them to see how well (or poorly) I do over the course of the season. Enjoy!

Week Four NCAA Picks Post:

Oklahoma over Missouri

Analysis: Oklahoma’s offense and defense are both very good, and Missouri didn’t prove they could win against Arizona State, losing 37-30 in OT. James Franklin will probably struggle to carve up the Oklahoma defense like he did the ASU secondary, and I wonder just how much pressure their defense will be able to apply to Landry Jones. Jones will make poor throws when he has pressure in his face, so that will be the key to hanging in on this game. The problem is, I don’t think Missouri’s secondary can hold up consistently if the Tigers are forced to blitz to create pressure.

Oklahoma by 17

LSU over West Virginia

Analysis: LSU’s defense is the best in the country as far as I’m concerned. They were tested right off the bat against Oregon and stood very tall. I’ve never seen a defensive tackle rotation like theirs in all my years of watching football. I believe that they have four starting caliber defensive tackles, and they arguably have three starting caliber cornerbacks in Morris Claiborne, Tyrann Mathieu and Tharold Simon. Claiborne is a junior and Mathieu and Simon are both sophomores, but they might be the best trio of cornerbacks in the country. LSU’s run defense and pass defense are both very good and their defense is very fast, and I think they are going to cause a lot of problems for Geno Smith and his offensive counterparts. On defense, West Virginia will have to pressure Jarrett Lee, but also stop LSU from establishing the running game because they love to run play action after establishing the run (and they’re quite good at it). Without the play action fake LSU struggles to threaten downfield due to Lee’s lack of arm strength. However, I think WVU will struggle to take away the run game, end up loading the box, and therefore allowing Rueben Randle, Odell Beckham and Deagnelo Peterson to get behind the secondary.

LSU by 16

Alabama over Arkansas

This one was tough for me to call. Alabama probably has the #2 defense in the country behind LSU (at least as far as I’m concerned, but it’s definitely close) and they have a quarterback with limited experience as well in AJ McCarron. Luckily, they have two talented running backs to take the pressure off of him in Trent Richardson and Eddie Lacy. Marquis Maze has stepped up as I thought he would and has 15 receptions, 186 yards and 1 TD in the first three contests. I think Alabama will be able to move the ball on offense against Arkansas’ defense, but I think that Alabama will be able to slow down the Razorbacks offensive attack. I love their WR’s, led by Cobi Hamilton as of now (13 receptions, a team leading 252 yards, 19.4 average per catch and 1 TD) and Tyler Wilson has stepped in to fill the void left by Ryan Mallett like I thought he would. However, Alabama’s defense is vastly better than Missouri State, New Mexico, Troy (the three teams he has faced this year) and much better than Auburn’s defense that struggled mightily to stop big, physically gifted receivers every time they matched up against them. Arkansas won’t get shut out by any means, but Alabama is going to be Tyler Wilson’s first real taste of what it’s like to play against a SEC caliber defense, and I don’t think he’s going to enjoy it.

Alabama by 13

Boise State over Tulsa

This really isn’t a hard pick in my opinion. Boise State’s defensive line is fierce and I expect Billy Winn and company to be in GJ Kinne’s face for the majority of this game. Boise State’s offense is still clicking thanks to Kellen Moore, so I expect this to be a relatively easy win. Kinne has a chance to show talent evaluators what he can do though, as his team is clearly overmatched.

Boise State by 21

Wisconsin over South Dakota

This shouldn’t be much of a contest either, as Wisconsin’s offense has the potential to be one of the best in the Big 10 if it isn’t already the best. Their running game and play action game will be way too much for South Dakota to handle, and hopefully they have continued to work on their run defense. If they don’t have it tuned up soon they will have a lot of trouble stopping Nebraska.

Wisconsin by 21

Texas A&M over Oklahoma State

This one was very tough for me to call as well. This could very easily go either way considering it is a rare battle between the #7 and #8 teams in the country. Oklahoma State’s offense is a juggernaut still led by Brandon Weeden and Justin Blackmon, but Weeden has thrown 6 interceptions already this season, so that is a concerning stat for OSU fans. However, Joseph Randle has stepped up to replace Kendall Hunter very nicely, running for 378 yards and 7 TD’s on only 62 carries (6.1 average). Ryan Tannehill is a dangerous quarterback though, and he’s got a number of weapons to work with. I’m not sure which defense is better than the other, but I do think that Texas A&M will miss Von Miller rushing the passer in this game. However, Oklahoma State’s defense is traditionally their weakness, so that is why I had to go with Texas A&M. I will be at an away game during this contest and I am very angry that I will miss it. It should be a great game. But I had to give A&M the slight edge.

Texas A&M by 6

Nebraska over Wyoming

Not a very tough call on this one. Nebraska should win this game easily even if Taylor Martinez doesn’t dazzle as a passer.

Nebraska by 28

Oregon over Arizona

This one wasn’t as easy for me to pick as I thought it might be. Oregon has a pretty good defense, but Arizona can move the football pretty well. I’m still confident in Oregon, but Nick Foles has a habit of surprising people when they sleep on him. I don’t think Oregon will take him for granted though especially after losing a tough one to LSU in Cowboys Stadium, and that’s why I think they will end up with a big Pac-12 win here.

Oregon by 14

Clemson over Florida State (Upset)

Clemson is absolutely on fire right now, and this is the worst time for Florida State to be playing them. This isn’t a guarantee by any means, but Clemson’s offense is firing on all cylinders and Florida State didn’t get consistent pressure on Landry Jones last week. Clemson’s offensive line isn’t nearly the equivalent of Oklahoma’s, but they have enough weapons on offense to at least make this a plausible upset. I don’t think Clemson has the defense to keep them in the game if they can’t score, so unless their defense steps up and slows FSU down they are going to make me look foolish for this pick.

Clemson by 7

South Carolina over Vanderbilt

This isn’t as easy of a pick as I thought it would be, especially since South Carolina is in a state of flux and Vanderbilt is undefeated for the first time in recent memory after three weeks. I don’t think Vanderbilt will be able to hold off South Carolina, but stranger things have happened. If it was ever going to happen, I think it would happen now. Steve Spurrier doesn’t seem to have much faith in Stephen Garcia and even though they have one of the best backs in the country in Marcus Lattimore you just never know what will happen in the SEC. I don’t expect Vanderbilt to pull it off, but this is one I would watch as a POSSIBLE upset.

South Carolina by 10

Virginia Tech over Marshall

Analysis: This shouldn’t be much of a challenge for Virginia Tech, but it should be a good tune-up game for Logan Thomas. I think he has tons of upside, and it’ll be interesting to see how he develops throughout the season.

Virginia Tech by 17

Florida over Kentucky

Analysis: Kentucky isn’t a terrible team, but Florida’s defense is vastly better than I expected it to be even without Janoris Jenkins. Chris Rainey really impressed me last week and if he can stay healthy I think he could really improve his draft stock. I’m pretty high on Jonathan Bostic, Jaye Howard and Dominique Easley on their defense, so I’m excited to see them play against Kentucky again. I don’t anticipate the Gators having a lot of trouble in this game.

Florida by 14

Baylor over Rice

Analysis: Robert Griffin has been absolutely LETHAL this year. He’s 41/49 for 624 yards (83.7% completion), 12.74 yards per attempts and he has 8 touchdowns and no interceptions. On top of that, he has 116 yards rushing. Kendall Wright has been huge for Baylor with 20 receptions (14 more than the next receiver), 312 yards (184 yards more than the next receiver) and 3 TD’s. I don’t think Rice has much of a chance to slow Griffin down. The first time he might slow down in my estimation would be October 15th against A&M once they get into the real meat of their schedule. I haven’t been able to watch much of him, but it will be interesting to go back and watch him play to see if he has corrected any of the things I said he needed to work on in my preseason scouting report.

Baylor by 21

South Florida over UTEP

Analysis: South Florida is having one of their best seasons in recent memory, at least to start the season, and BJ Daniels seems to be maturing rather nicely. As long as he continues to develop the sky is the limit for USF, and I don’t think UTEP will have much of a chance to slow them down this week.

South Florida by 17

TCU over Portland State

Analysis: TCU lost a tough one against Baylor in week one, but they seemed to have bounced back in recent weeks. Portland State shouldn’t pose much of a threat, even with an inexperienced quarterback still getting a feel for the starting role.

TCU by 17

Michigan over San Diego State

Analysis: Brady Hoke welcomes his former team into the Big House as the Head Coach of the Wolverines this week as pretty heavy favorites. Denard Robinson isn’t my favorite quarterback but he is incredibly fast and I’m not sure SDSU has the speed to keep up with him in this game. Junior Hemingway has really stepped up this year (even though he looks like a TE rumbling downfield sometimes on go routes). It’ll be interesting to see how Michigan does in this game, but I would be pretty surprised if they botched this game after clawing their way into the top 25.

Michigan by 17

USC over Arizona State

Analysis: Before the game against Illinois last week I might have picked Arizona State in this one, but Brock Osweiler is still developing and even though the Sun Devils had a huge win against Missouri a couple weeks ago I don’t think they are ready to knock off USC. USC has a big chip on its shoulder because of the bowl ban that was placed on them, and I think they will approach this game with something to prove even though they are favored.

USC by 10

Illinois over Western Michigan

Analysis: This shouldn’t be a challenging game for Illinois. Western Michigan isn’t a bad program, but I don’t think they have the firepower to stick with Illinois on either side of the ball. They just fought their way into the top 25, so I don’t think they’ll get upset after just earning their #24 ranking.

North Carolina over Georgia Tech (Upset)

Analysis: I have to admit that I am a UNC fan, so that may have had something to do with this pick (which really isn’t much of an upset, though technically it is). I think UNC’s offense can score on Georgia Tech’s defense, and I think UNC’s defense is fast enough and disciplined enough to slow down Georgia Tech’s option offense that absolutely dominated Kansas last week. Georgia Tech is flying high, but UNC usually plays them pretty well and they are talented enough to pull this off. I really wish I could see this game, but I will be traveling and working while it goes on.

Those are my picks for this week. Hopefully you enjoy them and I look forward to seeing some good football this week. Thanks for reading!


– LSU-Mississippi State:


This game will be a game pitting strength versus strength, as Mississippi State’s run game will be facing a very tough LSU run defense. They are fast enough to take away a speed rushing attack like Oregon, but they are big enough and strong enough to match-up relatively effectively with a more powerful attack like Mississippi State’s. This match-up will be important, but because LSU will be so worried about stopping the run it may be just as critical for Chris Relf to demonstrate the ability to threaten the defense with the pass, especially downfield in the 10-15+ yard range. If they can’t do that, I think that Mississippi State will struggle to run the ball consistently throughout the game.

On the offensive side of the ball for LSU, running the ball will be key as well, but the deciding factor of the game may reside on Jarrett Lee’s ability to stretch the field, move the ball through the air, and keep running lanes open for Spencer Ware and the rest of LSU’s rushing attack. If they can run the ball effectively play action will be a key weapon for Lee and the rest of the offense, but if the burden falls on Lee to loosen up running lanes with downfield passing then LSU could struggle. Lee is an accurate passer but doesn’t have a rocket arm and I would compare him to Matt Flynn, a very successful former LSU Tiger quarterback. If Lee steps up and can carry the offense (this would be significantly easier if his receivers caught passes once they hit them in the hands) then LSU should be fine either way, but if Lee isn’t up to the challenge then LSU could be in trouble in their conference opener.

Key Players- LSU:

Jarrett Lee will be making his third start of the season and he has looked solid thus far, though his statistics have been hurt by some dropped passes in their opening games. This will be my second opportunity to watch him, the first being in the opening week against Oregon. I will be interested to see how he plays and how he has progressed since the opening weekend of the season. I think he has potential, and while he won’t be a first round pick by any means, I do think he warrants mid-late round consideration. He would fit into a West Coast offense very nicely, perhaps similar to Colt McCoy in Cleveland.

I’m a big fan of Tyrann Mathieu, and watching him play is always a treat. I think he has first round potential and I’ve thought that since he was playing at an All-American level early on in his freshman year last year. He is very good in coverage, he blitzes extremely well, he’s a great tackler, and he has a great knack for forcing fumbles and just being around the ball. He is the definition of a ball-hawk. I would be surprised if he didn’t force a turnover in this game.

Spencer Ware will be an important component of this game. He has had a relatively slow start to the season relative to his great cap to his freshman year with a 10 carry, 102 yard performance against Texas A&M in the Cotton Bowl, but I think he will get stronger as the season goes on. He’s definitely a power back as he is relatively compact at 5’11”, 225 pounds and he shows it. I like his running style and I think he will be a key cog in LSU’s offense because if the run game is slowed or ineffective Jarrett Lee won’t be able to utilize play action effectively and the offense may become one dimensional. Considering Lee’s relatively limited amount of starting experience I don’t think that is a path LSU should go down in their conference opener, especially on a national stage. But I think a lot of people underestimate what Lee brings to the table, and I think he is ready to step up should the running game not pace the offense in this game.

Deangelo Peterson, the tight end on LSU, is another key guy to watch. His stat line may not blow you away (5 receptions, 71 yards and 1 TD in 2 games so far) but he has great size at 6’4″, 235 pounds and he is very athletic. I imagine as Lee becomes more comfortable in the starting role that Peterson will become one of his frequent targets, and I don’t think it is out of the ordinary for them to split him out in the slot. He is a very dangerous red zone threat, and because of his size he is an easy target for Lee to throw to. I predict that he will have a touchdown in this game, and I hope that his skills will be on full display tonight.

Morris Claiborne is going to be an interesting guy to watch in this game because if Mississippi State has any success throwing the ball it will probably be going after someone other than him. He is replacing Patrick Peterson as “the” corner on LSU’s defense, and he’s got the size and athletic ability to do it. He had 6 pass break-ups and 5 INT’s last year when defenses targeted him instead of throwing at Peterson consistently, but now this year teams will certainly be avoiding him if they can help it. I don’t know if they will match him up against Mississippi State’s perceived best receiver (I’m a fan of Chris Smith), or if they will just let him attempt to shut down one side of the field, but if Relf decides to test him he had better make sure it’s a good ball because if he makes a mistake Claiborne knows how to make him pay.

Sleeper: Barkevious Mingo, on top of having an absolutely fantastic name, has a boatload of potential as a defensive end. He’s only a sophomore and he is about 6’5”, 240 pounds, but as a freshman last year he had 35 total tackles (18 solo), 5.5 TFL, 2.5 sacks, 2 forced fumbles and 6 pass break-ups, which is pretty great for a freshman at a position that generally has a long development period. He is very athletic and has chased down some pretty athletic running backs in his day, and seems to have a very good motor as evidenced by his backside pursuit. I’m excited to see how he will do against a Mississippi State offensive line that likes to run the ball, but is missing their best pass protector from a year ago in Derek Sherrod. Mingo could have a big game, though he is pretty raw, but I am excited about his potential so I want to see how he does.

Key Players- Mississippi State:

Chris Relf is a guy who is better known for his running than his passing, but his size definitely helps him in both aspects. He stands at 6’4”, 245 pounds and could probably convert to RB or FB at the next level, but I haven’t watched him enough to specifically project him to any one position yet. I don’t think he will be a QB at the next level, but he has shown some signs of improvement since last season. He threw for 1,776 yards in 13 games (an average of only 136.6 yards per game), completing 59% of his passes (128/217, a low number of passes attempted) for 12 TD’s and 6 INT’s. He was an efficient QB, but he wasn’t throwing the ball very much. This year it seems to be a bit different having already attempted 54 passes in just two games (33/55 for a 61.1% completion) for 397 yards, 3 touchdowns and only one interception. LSU will be a big test for him one week after he had a solid but relatively unspectacular game with 195 yards (60.6% completion with a 5.9 YPA, well below his average from last season) and 1 touchdown and interception against Auburn. LSU has a very tough defense that frequently creates turnovers, so ball security and making smart decisions will be critical for him in this game. I have to say that if Relf ends up throwing 25+ or even 30+ times in this game I think Mississippi State will lose. That will mean their running game is being slowed by LSU’s tough front seven, and the onus will be placed on Relf to move the ball through the air to open up running lanes. Against Memphis (obviously a totally different class of opponent) he threw 21 times, was very efficient and they won easily. Against Auburn in a close game (final score of 41-34) he threw 33 times, was less efficient with one interception and only a 5.9 YPA (which is in stark contrast to his 2010 season average of 8.2 and his 9.6 YPA against Memphis). To drill this point home a bit, when Relf threw 25 times or more last year Mississippi lost both games which accounted for two of their four losses on the season. The other losses were against LSU when he threw the ball only 8 times for 35 yards and 2 interceptions and against Alabama when he threw the ball 16 times for 70 yards and an interception. In the two other losses he threw the ball 25 times or more and lost in a close game (17-14 to Auburn and 38-31 to Arkansas, though he had a good game against them). So that is a trend of three losses in a row when Relf throws the ball 25 times or more, and it will be interesting to see if he is forced to surpass that number of attempts against LSU’s defense.

Vick Ballard is the other key cog to Mississippi State’s offense that focuses intently on the running game. Ballard had a fantastic season last year rushing 187 times for 981 yards (a 5.25 ypc average) and 20 touchdowns. This year, as a senior, he already has 301 yards rushing on just 31 attempts (an astounding 9.71 ypc) and 4 touchdowns. His success tonight against LSU’s tough run defense will set the tone for the game, and if he can find running room and grind out tough yards and first downs then it will make life significantly easier for Relf and the rest of Mississippi State’s passing attack. Don’t be surprised if he ends up with a game with about 20 attempts, 75-80 yards and maybe a score though, because yards are hard to come by against LSU’s defense.

Chris Smith is a receiver on Mississippi State that I came away impressed with after watching him against Michigan last year. He had a relatively mediocre statistical year last year with only 24 receptions, 264 yards and 1 touchdown as a sophomore, but I like his size and his hands impressed me last year as well as his route running. Keep in mind, his 24 receptions were about 11.1% of Relf’s total completions last year, so even though it is a low total and not overly impressive, he still accounted for 11% of Relf’s total completions and almost 15% (14.86%) of Relf’s total passing yards. So while it might not be obvious, he was a target for Mississippi State last year in the passing game. He only has two catches for 11 yards so far this year, so I am really hoping he finds a way to step up and make some plays in this game. I love players that find a way to make plays in critical games like this, especially on big stages, and I am hoping that Smith will find a way to do that tonight even against a talented LSU secondary.

Jonathan Banks is a cornerback that I came away very impressed with last year when I was actually watching the Bulldogs to get a look at Derek Sherrod. He has been very reliable and consistent for the Bulldogs ever since his freshman year. Now a junior, Banks already has an interception and two pass break-ups this year, bringing his career total to 8 interceptions (7 in his previous two seasons) and 12 pass break-ups. He is a very tall, skinny corner as he stands at a listed height and weight of 6’2”, 185 pounds. I mentioned him in a previous post listing potential break-out players for this 2011 season, and mentioned that I am going to be watching him to evaluate his hips, namely his ability to flip his hips in coverage, his ability to click and close on passes in front of him, and his ability to recover if and when he makes a mistake. He has already demonstrated his ability to use his size to his advantage, and he has shown the ability to turn and run with receivers downfield. I just want to see how well he transitions, because it’s pretty obvious when you watch him play that he can locate the ball in the air and make a play on it. He has impressive ball skills, and his size really helps him defend 50/50 balls even against very tall wide receivers. LSU has some big guys like they always do, so look for Banks to mirror them and take away some of Lee’s bigger, more physical targets.

Nickoe Whitley is a safety that I noticed around the same time I noticed Banks last year. He demonstrated impressive ball skills when I watched him last year and seemed to be a pretty good tackler which is evidenced by his 34 solo tackles (52 total). He also had 1.5 sacks, 3 pass break ups, 3 INT’s and 1 forced fumble last year. He already has an INT this year as well as one pass break up (plus a pretty impressive 6 solo tackles out of 7 total). It will be interesting to see if he is tested deep much as Jarrett Lee doesn’t have a very strong arm. I could see him playing up in the box more, so it will be interesting to see if he lets anyone get behind him in this game.

Sleeper: My sleeper for the Bulldogs is Jameon Lewis, a freshman receiver. He already has 5 receptions, 116 yards and 1 TD as well as 2 rushes for 29 yards and 1 TD. In addition, he returns kicks and punts as well though his success has been limited in that aspect so far. He is a smaller guy listed at 5’9”, 185 pounds, though packing 185 pounds onto that small of a frame is actually pretty impressive (has a similar build to Jerrel Jernigan, the WR from Troy who actually was very well built for a small receiver). The Bulldogs have shown that they like to get the ball in his hands any way they can, whether it is throwing it to him, handing it off or letting him return kicks and punts, so look for at least one big play from him in this game.

I apologize for the length of this post. It started out shorter but I got really in depth. Hopefully you enjoyed the read and it got you excited for this SEC matchup tonight. Enjoy!


Here are my notes on the LSU-Florida game from earlier this season. I took notes on the guys who stuck out to me throughout the game so I may have to go back again later to get a look at some players that I missed. Hopefully you enjoy what I have here though! I hit on a number of pretty well known guys. Enjoy!

Notes on LSU-Florida 2010:

Patrick Peterson

I didn’t see much of Peterson in coverage because of the camera angles and he was rarely tested if ever, so I don’t have a lot of notes on him from a coverage perspective. He’s definitely a freak athlete though and he does a great job as a return man. I look forward to getting to see him more in coverage at a later date.

Marcus Gilbert

Gilbert has great size and gets a pretty good push in the run game because of his size and strength and he does a solid job of getting his pads low enough to get a good shot at winning the leverage battle. However, he has pretty slow feet and it showed when he had to do anything besides drive block (like on a stretch play or if they ran a zone run play) and also when he had to pass block. That’s not to say he got beaten off the edge badly, but he definitely is not going to stick at LT in the NFL. He is going to have to try RT first obviously. His size and foot speed reminds me of Phil Loadholt a bit, but obviously Loadholt is bigger and gets a better push versus the run. Right now I would grade Gilbert as about a 4th round pick.

Mike Pouncey

Pouncey is a nice guard prospect but he just does not have it at center. He is doing much better than he was earlier in the season, but in their first game of the year he had numerous bad snaps and he has improved his shotgun snapping to “average” or “decent” by this point, and that might be an overstatement at times. However, he looks like he will be a quality OG prospect despite all of this. I would grade him as a 2nd rounder at this point since he has had kind of a down year, but he definitely has 1st round talent and it showed last year. He was blocking Drake Nevis one on one often in this game and though Nevis got the better of him at times he also had his share of one on one victories against him. Nevis got pressure going against Pouncey a few times, but if Nevis made a big play or a tackle for loss he was abusing someone else on Florida’s line, not Pouncey. Pouncey looks like he should be a quality guard prospect but I just can’t put that 1st round grade on him right now. He could definitely make himself a lot of money with a good performance at the senior bowl though.

Carl Johnson

Johnson has impressive size and strength and he can get a good push in the run game, but he doesn’t seem very technically sound. He looks like he leans into blocks a lot and might be a bit of a waist bender (this might be an issue with Gilbert as well) but I didn’t pay specific enough attention to check that. He looks like a solid guard prospect at the next level, and I’d grade him as a 4th-5th rounder based off of how much I’ve seen of him so far. He’s solid, but I think he needs some technique work and he doesn’t have very good foot speed.

Drake Nevis #92

Drake Nevis was an absolute beast in this game. He has great quickness off the ball and has impressive hand usage and pass rush moves for a college defensive tackle. He gets off the ball well consistently (sometimes he will be slow off of it, but that happens) and sometimes his initial move will be so good that he will just burst right past the guy trying to block him. But there were times in this game when he just dominated double teams as a pass rusher and he really showed his potential as a big time defensive tackle on a regular basis in this game. He and Pouncey had some interesting battles but I’d say it was about even with Nevis getting penetration against him in the pass game at times but other times Pouncey would neutralize him pretty effectively one on one. Despite his great hand usage I think he still needs technique work because sometimes he will stop moving his feet and he won’t keep driving his legs to continue to get a push, and sometimes he played too high and that helped Pouncey and others neutralize him. He may not be a huge DT, but there were times when he played with effective leverage that he was very difficult to move in the run game. I’m not sure he will ever be able to stand up against a double team from offensive linemen as big as the Gators’ linemen are but he definitely looks like a nice UT prospect in the NFL. I give him a top 15 grade right now because he can just be so incredibly disruptive that I love his potential. The trick will be evaluating his work ethic because if he just coasts on his natural ability once he gets to the NFL his impact will be limited, but if he works at his craft and continues to develop he could be a very good UT in a 4-3.

John Brantley

Brantley had a solid game, he definitely looked better in this game than he did earlier in the season. The most impressive thing that I noticed was how tough this guy is. Not only was he allegedly playing with 4 cracked ribs and an injured thumb (some said it was broken but I don’t know if that is true) but even despite that there were a couple of plays where he knew the pressure was coming but he stood tall in the pocket and delivered a threw even though he knew he was going to get hit, and he did. But he got up and kept playing anyways. That’s just impressive to me. He showed more pocket poise than I thought he had, and he did a better job of going through his progressions than I thought he would, but he still stared down one receiver or one side of the field pretty often and it looked like he was getting his audibles from the sideline (but I thought that about Bradford too, which apparently was wrong). He definitely made some nice throws in this game though. He converted a few very key third down passes on third and medium or third and long and he made a couple nice pre-snap reads where he recognized the blitz and found his hot read right away for a quality completion. Those are encouraging plays for him as a NFL prospect. Not to mention he has a very strong arm and he is pretty accurate from what I can tell. He has a ways to go still, but he has definitely improved since the start of the season which is all you can really ask. I’d be shocked if he left early, so I look forward to seeing how he finishes off the season and how he looks in Florida’s bowl game. Right now, not knowing how his senior year will go, I’d project him as a 4th-5th round pick because he has pretty nice tools as far as size, arm strength, toughness and he has shown enough signs of intelligence that I like to think he’s pretty smart. So if a team interviews him and comes to the same conclusion I could see them drafting him as a #3 guy to develop into an eventual back-up. It’s hard for me to envision him being a starter in the NFL based off of what I have seen at this point however.

Janoris Jenkins

The first thing I noticed about Jenkins is how well he supports the run and the fact that he seems to be a good tackler. He couldn’t always take Ridley down one on one in the backfield but he was regularly the first to hit him and slow him down, and he made a number of nice tackles in the backfield or at the line of scrimmage in this game. He is pretty aggressive at the line of scrimmage and he has active enough hands to get off of receiver blocks at the line of scrimmage, or at least he managed to do that in this game. He isn’t a very big corner, but he is aggressive and he did what he could to re-route receivers at the line of scrimmage. He could use some work on jamming, but he did an ok job. When he did get beat off the line when he was trying to jam he showed good quickness and recovery speed to catch up to the receiver in his route. He seemed comfortable in man coverage but also looked pretty good in zone, though he was rarely challenged. I love how he supports the run as a corner though, and his quickness and burst make me think he would be very good in a zone-heavy scheme. I need to see him in man coverage more before I come to a conclusion about him being a quality man coverage corner in the NFL. He definitely has impressive ball skills though and he locates the ball well while in flight and makes good adjustments to make a play on it. Not to mention the fact that he is very dangerous as a return man on punts and after he makes an interception. I grade Jenkins as a 1st-2nd rounder right now because even if he is a great zone corner and a solid man coverage corner his play-making ability makes him worth a late first or early second round pick, but he could be the #3 corner in this class if he plays well enough in man coverage. I just haven’t seen enough of his film to figure that out yet.

Ahmad Black

I can’t say I was very impressed with Ahmad Black in this game. He packs a punch as a hitter, but he didn’t seem to take very good angles in run defense and he didn’t seem to break down well for wrap up tackles at times. I didn’t see much of him because he was regularly out of the camera shot, but even in run support I was not impressed and I did not like what I saw from him in man or zone coverage either. I would grade him as a 5th-6th round pick at this point because he probably offers some ability as a special teamer and could develop into a back-up safety at some point, but he doesn’t look like a NFL starter at all to me.

Joseph Barksdale

Barksdale was pretty underwhelming in this game. He has good size and strength, but outside of that he isn’t much of a prospect in my opinion. He doesn’t have good foot speed so against good speed rushers he will have trouble taking away the edge, he doesn’t have a good initial punch to shock the defender and he doesn’t sustain blocks well after he gets his hands on the defender. Usually with big, lumbering offensive tackles they won’t always get their hands on the quick speed rushers but if they do they take them out of the play, but that is not the case with Barksdale. Not only was he not very impressive to me in the passing game but he didn’t make a quality impact in the running game either. He struggled getting to the second level which speaks to his lack of quality foot speed and he again struggled to sustain blocks in this phase of the game. He needs technique work in my opinion because he does not always keep his feet churning to help him sustain and drive his man, he doesn’t have a good punch and he will sometimes lean and over-extend himself, making him susceptible to a pass rush move. He looked like a 5th-6th round prospect to me in this game. He has good size and strength but his technique needs improvement and his ceiling isn’t any higher than a potentially solid RT in the NFL because of his foot speed and because he has not generated much of a push in the run game either. He has career back-up written all over him in my opinion.

Terrence Toliver

Toliver really impressed me in this game. I have to admit I expected to see a receiver with questionable hands because former LSU receivers have had problems with drops, but that is not what I saw. He did drop one pass that I thought he should have caught even though it was high, but other than that he did a great job of catching the ball with hands away from his body, securing the ball and then making a smooth move to pick up yards after the catch. He made a number of key catches in this game, including two or three big ones on LSU’s final drive to take the lead late in the game. He had two touchdowns in this game including the eventual game winner on a fade route to the corner of the end zone. I love players that show up on 3rd downs, in critical situations and especially late in close games. Toliver did all of that and more by not only making catches for 3rd downs but picking up yards after the catch and winning the game for LSU on that final drive by setting them up inside the 10 yard line with a key catch and then catching the clinching touchdown. I’m not saying he is a dominant talent, but he really showed up big in this game and I came away extremely impressed. I would probably give him a 3rd round grade right now but he looks like a nice #2 receiver in the NFL. I don’t think he is a #1, but he seems to have reliable enough hands, good enough quickness to create some separation and he can stretch the field a bit too with his size and 4.5 speed. But most importantly he shows up when his team needs him and when the pressure is on, and I love seeing that attribute in players and in the short time I have been scouting those players seem to pan out, so it was great to see that in Toliver.

Jarrett Lee

I don’t have an abundance of good things to say about Jarrett Lee but I thought I’d take notes on him to make sure I didn’t miss out on another Matt Flynn, though I don’t think I would have. Lee looked alright in this game and showed some accuracy and solid decision making in the face of pressure, plus he seems to be pretty smart and made a couple nice hot reads, but unless he gets into a post-season game and demonstrates above-average arm strength, good accuracy and good pocket poise and decision making I don’t think he will be drafted. He’s not very tall, he has limited playing experience, he doesn’t look like he has much more than average arm strength and solid accuracy… I thought he made a couple nice decisions under pressure but the sample size is just too small to draw significant conclusions from his play. I need to see more of him and so do NFL talent evaluators, so I really hope he gets an invite to the East-West Shrine game or the Texas versus The Nation game so I can see him against comparable competition day in and day out.

Carl Moore

I did not think much of Carl Moore before this game but I like him a lot as a prospect after it. I don’t think he will ever be a #1 or even a #2 WR, but I think he has NFL potential as a solid #3 or #4 receiver. He may not get drafted, but I think he should get drafted. He has great size at about 6’3”, 218 pounds and while he isn’t a burner with a reported 4.58 40 yard dash time he isn’t so slow that he can’t create separation. I haven’t seen enough of him to evaluate his route running, but I do know that every time Florida needs a 3rd down conversion or a big catch they go to him. Literally half of his catches (13 of his 27 on the season) have been on 3rd downs. Obviously he isn’t incredibly productive and he isn’t a starter for the Gators, but it speaks volumes that not only is he put in the games on 3rd down, but he consistently makes plays on critical 3rd down plays for the Gators. I don’t think he will ever get an invite to the Senior Bowl, but I hope he gets one to the East-West Shrine game because I think he could surprise some people. I don’t know how good his hands are or how well he catches away from his body, but his body of work on 3rd down for the Gators really intrigues me.

Hopefully you enjoyed my musings on how all of these guys played, and I’ll continue to churn out some notes like this until I finally have seen some people enough to churn out final scouting reports. That will be after bowl season I imagine. Thanks for reading!